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ojwc-use-cases-small.jpgWith over 3 billion devices and counting, Java on mobile devices is enjoying growth and huge adoption in many key markets around the world.

In the meantime, developers are pushing to build richer and more interesting applications, both from a functional as well as a user interface perspective. New use cases in mCommerce, social networking, location-based services, mobile cloud features, and access to functionality on the operator network are catalysts to create and deliver new compelling applications to the largest mobile user base.

To that end, Oracle is revving the mobile Java platform with Oracle Java Wireless Client 3.1 (OJWC). OJWC is an industry-leading Java ME implementation geared towards device manufacturers, operators, and OEMs who want to get to market quickly with a full-featured, high-performance mobile Java runtime.

This latest 3.1 release provides the following new functionality:

  • SIM Extensions—Enable remote content management on mobile handsets through SIM-based services
  • Oracle Mobile Developer APIs—Allow new use cases for Java ME applications on feature phones
  • Improved Content Management APIs—Facilitate content discovery and deployment
  • Network APIs—Leverage data from operator’s network for running smarter Java ME applications on resource-constrained devices
  • Other Enhancements—Aid integration with the device platforms

Oracle Java Wireless Client 3.1 will become available on devices over time as it is rolled out in markets around the world.

For developers, the new features such as the Oracle Mobile Developer APIs and the Network APIs are of particular interest. You will be able to start building applications for OJWC 3.1 with the upcoming next release of the Java ME SDK – stay tuned for this.

Find out all the details about OWJC here.

Cheers,

– Terrence

j1-moving-forward.png

Finally, I get a chance to catch my breath. JavaOne has been extremely busy and while there are still a few hours of good talks to go here is a quick summary so far:

General observations:

The vibe is very positive. Attendance is significantly up over previous years and the show is well organized. Feedback from attendees has been very excouraging – lots of good buzz on #javaone and other social channels. Many sessions are sold out or standing-room only.

Announcements:

This year’s JavaOne left no doubt Java is moving again, and picking up steam. Throughout the conference and in the various keynotes there was a host of announcements, strategic initiatives, roadmaps, product releases and updates.

I’ll try to summarize, focusing on the Java Platform, Java SE, and Java ME technologies:

Java SE and the Java Platform:

  • Oracle announces plans for advancing the Java SE Platform, including a vision beyond JDK 8
  • A JDK 7 for Mac OS X Developer Preview is now available, with full developer and consumer releases planned for 2012
  • NetBeans 7.1 Beta is now available, featuring full Java SE 7 support
  • Oracle details plans for JDK 8, proposed features, and a revised roadmap with extended scope, now scheduled for availability in summer 2013
  • Oracle is continuing its work to merge the HotSpot and JRockit JVMs, with the first converged features available in JDK 7
  • IBM announces availability of Java SE 7 across its products lines, the faster ever adoption of a new Java SE release by IBM
  • Oracle recently announced availability of Java SE 7 for Embedded on ARM and x86 platforms

OpenJDK:

  • OpenJDK hosts the development of JDK 7 for Mac OS X, JDK 8, and becomes the reference implementation for Java SE 8 and beyond
  • Twitter joins OpenJDK

JavaFX and Rich Client UI Technology:

  • The JavaFX 2.0 GA for Windows is now available
  • A JavaFX 2.0 for Mac OS X Developer Preview is now available, with GA releases planned starting 2012
  • NetBeans 7.1 Beta is now available, with JavaFX 2.0 support
  • Oracle details JavaFX roadmap to 2013, including cross-platform support for Mac OS X and Linux
  • Oracle announces plans to open source the JavaFX platform in the OpenJDK project
  • A private Beta for JavaFX Scene Builder is now available, with public Beta planned in early 2012
  • Oracle announces Project ‘Avatar’: A complete solution for Dynamic Rich Clients, including HTML5 support and back-end integration

Java ME:

  • Oracle increases investment in Java ME
  • Oracle Java Wireless Client (OJWC) 3.1 is now available
  • Oracle announces plans to evolve the Java ME Platform and align Java ME with Java SE 7 through:
    • Submission of new JSRs over the coming months
    • Updates of the CLDC Platform VM and library specifications to enable better alignment with Java SE 7 features
    • Creation of a “CDC Profile” in Java SE 8, which allows deployment of Java SE 8 implementations in resource-constrained environments
  • JavaFX to become the graphics framework of choice for mid-range and high-end embedded platforms
  • Oracle announces intent for full coverage of embedded vertical markets
  • Oracle plans increased and deeper integration of Java ME with content services (“Mobile Services Integration”)

For more information and details, please see the related press releases:

Summary

After speaking to many developers over the past days it’s clear JavaOne has brought renewed excitement and energy to the Java community. I personally am particularly excited about Java FX 2.0, the Mac OS X support for JDK 7 and JavaFX, and bringing Java ME back to the mainstream platform again.

Two more related links:

Cheers,

– Terrence

J1-india.png

JavaOne is coming to Hyderabad, India on May 10-11. It is shaping up to be a great event, with keynotes, dozens of sessions, Hands-On-Labs, the Exhibition, the OTN Night party, and of course, plenty of opportunities to learn, share, and network with your peers and experts from around the world.

JavaOne in Hyderabad is built around four tracks:

  • Core Java Platform
  • Java EE, Enterprise Computing, and the Cloud
  • Java SE, Client Side Technologies, and Rich User Experiences
  • Java ME, Mobile, and Embedded

The two conference days will be packed with information designed around these tracks. For complete data, see:

Because of India’s central role as one of the fastest-growing developing markets, JavaOne is putting particular focus on technologies suited for the Indian market, such as mobile Java. There will be a number of sessions and events at JavaOne driving home Oracle’s commitment to the Indian market, the Java platform, the Java ecosystem, and Java developers.

I will be talking about this as part of the JavaOne Technical Keynote on Tuesday at 2:15 pm. I will also be doing a couple of technical sessions and the mobile Java HOL.

More information and details on the show to follow as soon as they become available.

Cheers,

– Terrence

J1-India-reg.png  

Screen shot 2011-03-31 at 16.50.18.pngFind video surveillance intrusive? Uncomfortable with tracking of your web surfing habits? Your provider sifting through your email? Mining of your personal data without your approval or even knowledge?

How about your every movement being tracked, stored, and analyzed? Well, chances are your cell phone and operator are doing that, too. Only normally, you never see it happen.

But German politician Malte Spitz got hold of this cell-phone data. 6 months worth, 35831 data points. And he decided to publish it – to demonstrate just how invasive even everyday technology can be.

The German magazine ‘Die Zeit’ has this english-language article – a great read. But what’s even more fascinating is that the data was turned into an interactive visualization. It’s in German, but all you need to do is to click on the ‘play’ button. You’ll see Spitz’ phone being tracked across Germany, with timing and duration of calls and Internet connections, including linkage to his tweets and blog entries.

Here is a New York Times article on the same topic.

YOU are being watched, too … right now.

Cheers,

– Terrence

newsflash-757208.jpg

Two noteworthy items today:

The Oracle ADF Mobile Client was released last week. ADF Mobile extends the Oracle Application Development Framework to mobile developers. ADF Mobile allows developers to rapidly create, using visual development in JDeveloper, applications that can access critical enterprise business data via mobile devices.

browseDataSimulator1.gif

While ADF Mobile Browser has been available previously, the new release of ADF Mobile Client allows developers to create and deploy native mobile applications which can access native mobile functionality and allow disconnected access to enterprise data via data synchronization mechanisms.

Screen shot 2011-03-23 at 16.13.40.pngFor more information see the ADF Mobile home page which also contains a number of links to demos, getting started tutorials, the developers guide, downloads, and more. The ADF Mobile Client press release can be found here.

Next, the LWUIT team has been busily blogging about the new cool features of LWUIT, such as the advanced theming, the new Resource Editor, and a commercial application called Musix which demonstrates some of these advanced features in a slick, DRM’d music player.

Keep following the LWUIT blog for all the latest.

Cheers,

– Terrence

Nokia's new Chief Executive, Stephen Elo...Nokia's new Chief Executive, Stephen Elop speaks during a press conference on September 10, 2010 in Espoo, Finland. The world's largest mobile phone maker Nokia named a new software-oriented chief executive, Microsoft's Stephen Elop, to help it battle slumping profits and an eroding market share in the smartphone market. AFP PHOTO/LEHTIKUVA / Markku Ulander *** FINLAND OUT *** (Photo credit should read MARKKU ULANDER/AFP/Getty Images) From FT.com: “A memorandum by Nokia’s chief executive has delivered a blunt assessment of the company’s predicament, likening it to that of a man on a “burning platform” torn between being burnt alive and jumping into icy waters.”

You can read the full text of Stephen Elop’s memo at engadget.com.

Interesting times indeed.

Cheers,

— Terrence

OTN event map.png The first ever OTN Developer Day dedicated to Java is coming up next week, Nov 4th, in New York City.

The agenda covers a full day with four tracks: Server, Desktop, Mobile, and Embedded. I will be talking on two topics: Developing embedded applications with LWUIT as well as building compelling embedded solutions using Java.

The event happens at the Millennium Broadway Hotel on 145 West 44th Street, and registration is FREE.

More information and the registration link can be found on the main event page. If you can’t make it to New York this time, please check out the list of all Java-related future events.

See you there!

Cheers,

– Terrence

Oracle-Sun.png

UPDATES:

I was tied up in meetings most of the day yesterday so part 3 of the news round-up comes a day late … apologies.

Today, I’d like to summarize the highlights around developer communities and developer engagement under the Oracle+Sun announcements. I am mainly referring to “Overview and Frequently Asked Questions for the Developer Community” published on the Oracle Technology Network (OTN), but I will be including additional information I have collected in the past few days.

Summary points:

  • Oracle has a long history of engaging with developers on many levels and this history will continue with respect to Sun’s developer communities
  • The Oracle Technology Network (OTN) is one of the industry’s largest developer communities for both Oracle technologies as well as other industry-standard technologies such as Java and Linux. It is similar to the Sun Developer Network (SDN) in that it binds together the technical end-user community as well as Oracle developers and managers.
  • OTN features events, news, blogs, articles, wikis, discussions/forums, webcasts, downloads, FAQs, and more across a wide range of technology aspects, including databases, middleware, developer tools, enterprise management, and applications. Specifically for Java, check out the Java Developer Center.
  • Many of Sun’s developer sites and communities will remain unchanged in the near future: The Sun Developer Network (SDN), java.sun.com, java.net, BigAdmin, NetBeans.org, and others continue to operate normally. Some may be redesigned and integrated into OTN in the future in communication with the developer community.
  • Oracle enthusiastically supports Sun’s user groups such as the Java User Groups (JUGs), OpenSolaris User Groups, Java Champions, and other Sun-related user groups and has already started to reach out to these groups.
  • Oracle will also continue the tradition of Java evangelists committed to developer outreach, events, and programs.
  • Oracle will continue to invest in the Sun Academic Initiative (SAI) and Java Education and Development Initiative (JEDI) as well as in student communities generally, although the programs may be modified somewhat or migrated over to the Oracle Academy. More details to be provided as they become available.
  • Certification programs for Sun technologies: Oracle is committed to provide comprehensive training and certification programs in Sun technologies and will honor exam vouchers purchased through Sun.

JavaOne 2010:

As reported before JavaOne 2010 will be co-located with Oracle OpenWorld in San Francisco in the week of September 19. The call for papers (CFP) will go out shortly.

Sign up for the Oracle Developer Network (OTN):

Your SDN account will not be automatically migrated over to OTN. Sign up for a free account. Also, OTN features a number of regular publications such as the Java-related Dev2Dev Newsletter. Find more information here.

Cheers,

– Terrence

Ted-Farrell.png

UPDATES:

This is part 2 of the Oracle+Sun News Round-Up. You can find part 1 here. Part 3 comes tomorrow.

Today I focus on the Oracle’s Java Developer Tools Strategy Webcast with Ted Farrell, Chief Architect and Senior Vice President of Tools and Middleware at Oracle.

Talking points in the webcast:

  • Oracle’s motto is “Productivity with Choice”, meaning developers can pick the environment and tools they want – Oracle supports these choices of implementation technologies, development styles, platforms and databases, and IDEs
  • Oracle’s main Java development tools today are JDeveloper / Oracle ADF as well as Oracle Enterprise Pack for Eclipse
  • NetBeans will be offered as additional choice in the developer tools suite, complementing JDeveloper and Enterprise Pack for Eclipse and leveraging functionality between these tools
  • Hudson, Sun’s Continuous Integration Server, will move forward with increased investment and continue to be offered
  • Zembly has been discontinued by Sun in Nov 2009
  • Kenai is Sun’s hosted collaboration server. Oracle plans to discontinue the public interface of Kenai at this time and bring Kenai back in-house, add features, and leverage it for internal projects. Kenai may be brought back as a public offering later if appropriate.
  • NetBeans aims to be the best Java IDE, and will focus on Java and JavaFX technologies for EE, SE, and ME/mobile Java, as well as the NetBeans platform
  • Oracle will turn to and invest in the NetBeans community for additional features such as dynamic languages, plug-ins, etc.
  • NetBeans.org stays the same – the place for participation, plug-ins, platform, dialog, support, etc.
  • No short-term changes planned to NetBeans Partner Programs
  • Licensing/support/maintainance: No licenses will change. NB 6.7 and earlier follows Sun support policy. NB 6.8 follows Oracle support policies – better policy with more choices
  • New collaboration resource: Oracle Technology Network (OTN), and specifically the Java Technology Center, featuring events, news, blogs, articles, discussions/forums, webcasts, downloads, FAQs, and more
  • Events: Oracle OpenWorld/Develop, OTN Developer Days, user group events, and more. See the OTN site.
  • JavaOne: Continues as open community event for Java, co-located with Oracle Open World in San Francisco (Sep 19-23, 2010), plus taking JavaOne on the road to Brazil, Russia, India, China

That wraps up Ted’s webcast. Part 3 of the Oracle+Sun: Java News Round-Up follows tomorrow.

Cheers,

– Terrence

Java ME SDK Mac OS.jpg

Update:

  • Nov 12: The issue regarding Java 1.5 has been fixed. The Java ME SDK 3.0 for Mac OS should now work with both Java 1.5 and Java 1.6.

It’s been a long time in the making … but it’s finally here. Native Java ME development is coming to Mac OS X!

The Java ME SDK 3.0 for Mac OS (Early Access) was released this morning. It supports CLDC and includes the following features:

  • Brings the functionality of the Java ME SDK 3.0 to Mac developers – first official Mac release.
  • Unique architecture enables the developer to work with the real device directly from within the ME SDK 3.0.
  • Communication with the devices, application deployment and even On-Device debugging are supported over Wi-Fi.
  • Supports the latest CLDC Hot Spot VM and Java Micro Edition APIs
  • High-end Tools for optimizations: Profiler, Network Monitor, Support for Debugging, Wireless Messaging Console and more
  • Introducing JavaFX 1.2.1 Mobile emulator running on Mac OS
  • Integrated Device Search Database for easy reference
  • Powerful Autoupdate for additional plug-ins and product updates
  • Development Environment based on NetBeans Platform

Complete list of APIs supported:

  • Mobile Information Device Profile (MIDP) 2.1 (JSR 118)
  • Connected Limited Device Configuration (CLDC) 1.1 (JSR 139)
  • Java Technology for the Wireless Industry 1.0 (JSR 185)
  • Mobile Service Architecture 1.0 (JSR 248)
  • PDA Optional Packages for the J2ME Platform (JSR 75)
  • Java APIs for Bluetooth (JSR 82)
  • Mobile Media API (MMAPI) 1.2 (JSR 135)
  • J2ME Web Services Specification (JSR 172)
  • Security and Trust Services API for J2ME (JSR 177)
  • Location API for J2ME (JSR 179)
  • SIP API for J2ME (JSR 180)
  • Wireless Messaging API (WMA) 2.0 (JSR 205)
  • Content Handler API (JSR 211)
  • Scalable 2D Vector Graphics API for J2ME (JSR 226)
  • Payment API (JSR 229)Mobile Internationalization API (JSR 238)
  • Mobile Sensor API (JSR 256)
  • XML API for Java ME (JSR 280)

It is ready for download now. Check it out and let us know what you think!

Important Installation Note:

The Java ME SDK 3.0 for Mac OS requires Java 1.6. You can download Java 1.6 from Apple’s update website or install it via the Mac OS “Software Update”. Next, be sure to verify Java 1.6 is set as the default runtime for Java applications in the Java Preferences (Applications->Utilities->Java Preferences).

For more info and a screen shot check out the Java ME SDK blog.

Cheers,

– Terrence

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