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Screen shot 2011-02-18 at 11.12.58.png The TechCast “Java and Oracle, One Year Later” is now available in the OTN archives. Ajay Patel, VP Product Development, talks about a wide range of topics, changes, and plans since the Sun acquisition happened a year ago.

Some key quotes (partially paraphrased):

  • “One key thing we have learned … Java is not just a platform, it is also an ecosystem, and you can’t have an ecosystem without a community.”
  • “The objectives, strategically [for Java at Oracle] have been pretty clear: How do we drive adoption, how do we build a larger, stronger developer community, how do we really make the platform much more competitive.”
  • “It’s about transparency, involvement. IBM, RedHat, Apple have all agreed to working with us to make OpenJDK the best platform for open source development … it is a sign that the community has been waiting to move the Java platform forward.”
  • “It’s not just about Oracle anymore, it’s about Java, the technology, the community, the developer base, and how we work with them to move the innovation forward.”
  • “Java is strategic to Oracle, and the community is strategic for Java to be successful … it is critical to our business.”
  • On JavaFX 2.0: “… is coming to beta soon, with a release planned in second half [of 2011] … will give you a new, high-performance graphics engine, the new API for JavaFX … you will see a very strong, relevant platform for levering rich media platforms.”
  • On the JDK and SE: “… aggressively moving forward, JDK 7 is now code complete … looking good for getting JDK 7 out by summer as we promised. Started work on JDK 8, Jigsaw and Lambda are moving along nicely, on track for JDK 8 release next year … good progress.”
  • On Java EE and Glassfish: “… Very excited to have Glassfish 3.1 released, with clustering and management capabilities … working with the JCP to shortly submit a number of JSRs for Java EE 7 … You’ll see Java EE 7 becoming the platform for cloud-based development.”
  • “You will see Oracle continue to step up to this role of Java steward, making sure that the language, the technology, the platform … is competitive, relevant, and widely adopted.”

Highly recommended viewing.

Cheers,

– Terrence

OTN-TechCast.pngAjay Patel is Oracle’s VP of Product Development for Application Grid Products – and my boss ;-)

Tune in to watch a special OTN TechCast Live tomorrow, Tue Feb 15 @ 10 am PST and hear Ajay talk about the changes that have come to Java and Oracle since the Sun acquisition 12 months ago.

Cheers,

– Terrence

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It’s been a few quite tumultuous days. Time to relax and close out the week with a smile. Check out this Official Oracle Corporation Web Video

Cheers,

– Terrence

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UPDATES:

I was tied up in meetings most of the day yesterday so part 3 of the news round-up comes a day late … apologies.

Today, I’d like to summarize the highlights around developer communities and developer engagement under the Oracle+Sun announcements. I am mainly referring to “Overview and Frequently Asked Questions for the Developer Community” published on the Oracle Technology Network (OTN), but I will be including additional information I have collected in the past few days.

Summary points:

  • Oracle has a long history of engaging with developers on many levels and this history will continue with respect to Sun’s developer communities
  • The Oracle Technology Network (OTN) is one of the industry’s largest developer communities for both Oracle technologies as well as other industry-standard technologies such as Java and Linux. It is similar to the Sun Developer Network (SDN) in that it binds together the technical end-user community as well as Oracle developers and managers.
  • OTN features events, news, blogs, articles, wikis, discussions/forums, webcasts, downloads, FAQs, and more across a wide range of technology aspects, including databases, middleware, developer tools, enterprise management, and applications. Specifically for Java, check out the Java Developer Center.
  • Many of Sun’s developer sites and communities will remain unchanged in the near future: The Sun Developer Network (SDN), java.sun.com, java.net, BigAdmin, NetBeans.org, and others continue to operate normally. Some may be redesigned and integrated into OTN in the future in communication with the developer community.
  • Oracle enthusiastically supports Sun’s user groups such as the Java User Groups (JUGs), OpenSolaris User Groups, Java Champions, and other Sun-related user groups and has already started to reach out to these groups.
  • Oracle will also continue the tradition of Java evangelists committed to developer outreach, events, and programs.
  • Oracle will continue to invest in the Sun Academic Initiative (SAI) and Java Education and Development Initiative (JEDI) as well as in student communities generally, although the programs may be modified somewhat or migrated over to the Oracle Academy. More details to be provided as they become available.
  • Certification programs for Sun technologies: Oracle is committed to provide comprehensive training and certification programs in Sun technologies and will honor exam vouchers purchased through Sun.

JavaOne 2010:

As reported before JavaOne 2010 will be co-located with Oracle OpenWorld in San Francisco in the week of September 19. The call for papers (CFP) will go out shortly.

Sign up for the Oracle Developer Network (OTN):

Your SDN account will not be automatically migrated over to OTN. Sign up for a free account. Also, OTN features a number of regular publications such as the Java-related Dev2Dev Newsletter. Find more information here.

Cheers,

– Terrence

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UPDATES:

This is part 2 of the Oracle+Sun News Round-Up. You can find part 1 here. Part 3 comes tomorrow.

Today I focus on the Oracle’s Java Developer Tools Strategy Webcast with Ted Farrell, Chief Architect and Senior Vice President of Tools and Middleware at Oracle.

Talking points in the webcast:

  • Oracle’s motto is “Productivity with Choice”, meaning developers can pick the environment and tools they want – Oracle supports these choices of implementation technologies, development styles, platforms and databases, and IDEs
  • Oracle’s main Java development tools today are JDeveloper / Oracle ADF as well as Oracle Enterprise Pack for Eclipse
  • NetBeans will be offered as additional choice in the developer tools suite, complementing JDeveloper and Enterprise Pack for Eclipse and leveraging functionality between these tools
  • Hudson, Sun’s Continuous Integration Server, will move forward with increased investment and continue to be offered
  • Zembly has been discontinued by Sun in Nov 2009
  • Kenai is Sun’s hosted collaboration server. Oracle plans to discontinue the public interface of Kenai at this time and bring Kenai back in-house, add features, and leverage it for internal projects. Kenai may be brought back as a public offering later if appropriate.
  • NetBeans aims to be the best Java IDE, and will focus on Java and JavaFX technologies for EE, SE, and ME/mobile Java, as well as the NetBeans platform
  • Oracle will turn to and invest in the NetBeans community for additional features such as dynamic languages, plug-ins, etc.
  • NetBeans.org stays the same – the place for participation, plug-ins, platform, dialog, support, etc.
  • No short-term changes planned to NetBeans Partner Programs
  • Licensing/support/maintainance: No licenses will change. NB 6.7 and earlier follows Sun support policy. NB 6.8 follows Oracle support policies – better policy with more choices
  • New collaboration resource: Oracle Technology Network (OTN), and specifically the Java Technology Center, featuring events, news, blogs, articles, discussions/forums, webcasts, downloads, FAQs, and more
  • Events: Oracle OpenWorld/Develop, OTN Developer Days, user group events, and more. See the OTN site.
  • JavaOne: Continues as open community event for Java, co-located with Oracle Open World in San Francisco (Sep 19-23, 2010), plus taking JavaOne on the road to Brazil, Russia, India, China

That wraps up Ted’s webcast. Part 3 of the Oracle+Sun: Java News Round-Up follows tomorrow.

Cheers,

– Terrence

Picture 2.pngLast week saw a flurry of news, announcements, webcasts, and information around the Oracle-Sun acquisition.

In fact, there was so much detail it is easy to miss some of it … so I thought I’d summarize the most significant bits focusing on Java and the Java ecosystem (keep in mind that more information is becoming available on a daily basis so this is necessarily incomplete).

This is part 1 which is about the Java strategy. Part 2 (tomorrow) will be about Java developer tools, and part 3 (the day after) will be on developer communities.

Today, let’s dive into the webcast I already pointed out in my last blog:

The Oracle + Sun: Java Strategy Webcast, with Hassan Rizivi, VP of Oracle Fusion Middleware Development and Jeet Kaul, VP of Java Development.

High-level summary of the webcast:

  • Continued investment in Java platform across a range of servers and devices
  • Fuel futher innovation in the Java platform and JavaFX
  • Continue to support developer community, open source, and JCP

Specific talking points:

  • Java is critical to the IT industry, from smart cards all the way to enterprise servers
  • There are 9 million Java developers around the world, making Java the most popular programming language
  • Oracle relies heavily on Java: Middleware already is built on Java and future applications will be built on Java
  • Oracle has a long history of Java innovation and success
  • Oracle has been a JCP EC member for a long time
  • Continue to drive Java as the most widely used, productive, innovative, reliable, performant, and pervasive platform
  • HotSpot and JRocket continue to be strategic JVMs going forward
  • JDK 7 work continues, releases coming up in 2010, including improvements for dynamic languages
  • Java SE (desktop) is a core area of continued investment
  • Java EE (enterprise): Glassfish continues as the Java EE reference implementation and open source project (Oracle has already contributed to the Glassfish community in the past). See also Arun Gupta’s blog on Glassfish.
  • Java ME (mobile Java): Continue to advance the platform, improve performance, deliver optimized implementations, bring JavaFX to mobile
  • Unification of Java ME and Java SE APIs and capabilities
  • Improve interoperability between Java, JavaFX, and JavaScript
  • JavaFX is the platform for cross-platform content delivery, complementing Oracle’s existing technologies
  • Oracle will expand partnerships around embedded Java
  • The Java for Business support program will continue and expand under Oracle
  • JavaOne: Continues as open community event for Java, co-located with Oracle Open World in San Francisco (Sep 19-23, 2010), plus taking JavaOne on the road to Brazil, Russia, India, China

It’s clear that Oracle understands the importance of Java for its own business as well as for the IT industry as a whole. I’m happy to see a focus on the important topics that matter to developers and the Java ecosystem. Stay tuned.

For further information:

  • Be sure to bookmark the Oracle and Sun top-level page, which includes press releases, and information on products, downloads, customers and partners, support/services/sales, keynotes, and more
  • Also see the the Oracle + Sun Product Strategy Webcast Series containing videos on hardware, systems, software, solutions, and partner strategy

Cheers,

– Terrence

Picture 2.png With the acquisition of Sun many people in the Java community are asking themselves: What are Oracle’s plans for the Java platform?

Oracle is coming out swinging: Java is critical to their business and Oracle will be investing heavily into the Java platform and the Java ecosystem going forward. Please be sure to watch the following webcasts:

  • Thomas Kurian, EVP of Product Development at Oracle, talks about Oracle’s software strategy: webcast, slides
  • Hassan Rizivi, VP of Oracle Fusion Middleware Development and Jeet Kaul, VP of Java Development, talk about the Oracle + Sun Java Strategy: webcast (or click the screenshot)

I will be collecting some of the details in a later blog, but for now you can check out Jim Weaver’s blog where he summarized some key messages.

Cheers,

– Terrence

As of yesterday, Sun is a wholly-owned subsidiary of Oracle.

Having joined Sun in February of 1997 I thought I’d offer my tribute to Sun and share some thoughts about what Sun has meant to me and, I believe, what Sun has meant to the world.

When I think of Sun I think of innovation, integrity, and doing things differently. Sun always challenged conventions, right from its early days: the Sun-1, “The Network Is The Computer”, SPARC, Solaris, massive scalability, open systems, Java, picoJava, Space-Time-Computing,  OpenOffice, open source, eco responsibility, and much, much more.

Time and again, Sun offered alternatives to conventional IT wisdom. No matter which side you are on, choices are important in any industry, and in the IT industry they are vital. Innovation creates the opportunity we all need to grow and to evolve. That spirit will be missed.

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When I think of Sun I also think about Sun’s iconic longtime CEO and chairman Scott McNealy. Scott’s handwriting was all over the company – his scrappy “Kick Butt and Have Fun” was more than just a bumper sticker. Innovate like crazy, play hard, and have fun while you’re at it. It’s the adrenaline that drives Silicon Valley to this day.

Above all, it was Scott’s character and integrity that made Sun a great company to work for. There are many stories to tell about Scott and many lines to quote. Highly competitive and hard-working, but down-to-earth and compassionate (and, lest not forget, hilariously funny), to me Scott remains one of the most charismatic industry icons.

And finally, Sun always has been about its brilliant, creative, and passionate employees. I’ve had the fortune to work on many leading-edge projects and technologies at Sun with some of the brightest thinkers in the industry. The enthusiasm and creativity of the colleagues was awe-inspiring. It was cool and fun then, and in hindsight we realize we were making history.

There is much more to say but I’d like to point you to a treasure-trove of bits and pieces of Sun culture that employees have put together. Enjoy!

A Tribute Sun Microsystems

Sun – you will be missed. It been a wild ride (and not always fun, I must add).

A heartfelt thanks to you, Scott.

On to the next chapter. Kick Butt and Have Fun!

Cheers,

– Terrence

This just in.

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Yesterday, the European Competition Commissioner Nellie Kroes confirmed her statement that “she is optimistic that the case will have a satisfactory outcome …”. This comes after an announcement by Oracle to make commitments to customers, developers, and users of MySQL.

Cheers,

– Terrence  

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