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JavaOne endorsements

On the heels of recap #1 – here is recap #2 from the JavaOne 2015 Java ME keynote:

Java ME Embedded 8 endorsed by leading partners to enable intelligent edge devices:

For more details, see the video replay of the JavaOne Java ME keynote starting at 1hr:7min:50sec.

Cheers,

— Terrence

Screen Shot 2014 12 02 at 11 29 53

I wanted to draw your attention to a lot of good coverage of embedded topics in the last two issues of Java Magazine:

Current Issue (November/December):

  • Theme: Internet of Things – Java is Everywhere. Interview with Henrik Stahl, VP  Product Management, Oracle
  • JCP Awards for JSR 360 (CLDC 8) as “Most Significant JSR” and JSR 360 Spec Lead Michael Lagally as “Outstanding Spec Lead”
  • JCP Executive Series: Freescale’s Maulin Patel and The Java Advantage for IoT
  • Robots Make Factories Smarter
  • Code Java on the Raspberry Pi
  • A Smart-Home Platform for the Mass Market
  • The Device I/O API

Previous Issue (September/October):

  • Duke’s Choice Award for Perrone Robotics and their driverless cars and PiDome Home Automation and Internet of Things platform
  • The Maker Movement Evolves
  • Winners of the IoT Developer Challenge
  • Introducing Roboburgh
  • JCP Executive Series: ARM’s Zach Shelby and The Rise of the Machines
  • Fun and Games with Greenfoot and Kinect
  • Getting Started with Home Automation
To view and subscribe, see here.
 
Cheers,
— Terrence

This is bigAt JavaOne a few weeks ago, Oracle made available the Java ME 8.1 Developer Preview release for the Freescale FRDM-K64F (“Java ME 8.1 in 190 KB RAM”) and announced the upcoming full release of Java ME Embedded 8.1 (press release).

On Monday this week, we followed up as promised and posted the General Availability (GA) releases of Oracle Java ME 8.1 and the Oracle ME SDK 8.1.

Oracle Java ME Embedded 8.1 and ME SDK 8.1 New Features and Enhancements

  • Support for ARM Cortex-M3/-M4 micro-controllers
  • Updated Raspberry Pi support 
  • Updated Developer Preview on FRDM-K64 with mbed
  • Improved support for two additional Qualcomm Gobi device families
  • New communication, security, and networking features
  • New support for Eclipse IDE, including major update of the Eclipse MTJ plugin
  • Developer improvements: Tooling over USB, heap analysis, faster communication
  • A number of smaller enhancements and fixes

Java 8: Truly Scalable

With this release, Java ME 8 now fully lives up to its design promise of delivering a feature-rich Java 8 platform that scales from powerful embedded systems all the way down to resource-constrained singe-chip micro-controllers with as little as 128 KB of RAM.

Developers can now rely on a consistent, standards-based programming model and platform that allows true code reuse from large to small solutions … in most cases the same, unmodified application binary will run across the entire range of target devices – irrespective of the underlying hardware and software differences. This means faster time-to-market, improved security and flexibility, and the ability to deliver more product value, faster

No other embedded software technology can do that today.

Call to Action

Java ME 8: Making the programmable, scalable, and secure Internet of Things a reality!
 
Cheers,

— Terrence

On the heels of the release yesterday, here is the official press release:

Oracle Introduces the Latest Release of Oracle Java ME Embedded, with supporting quotes by V2COM and Telit.

Cheers,

— Terrence

NewImage

Update:

Announcing Oracle Java ME Embedded 8.1 Developer Preview for Freescale FRDM-K64F

Java ME 8 is purpose-designed to bring Java-powered software intelligence to a wide range of embedded devices – scaling all the way down to resource-constrained micro-controllers. Since the release of Java ME 8 a few months ago we’ve seen tremendous interest in the industry in leveraging Java as the software platform to bring the next generation of functionality and flexibility to embedded systems and the Internet of Things.

Today, we are accelerating the adoption of Java ME 8 with a Developer Preview of Oracle Java ME Embedded 8.1 on ARM Cortex-M4 devices, in collaboration with Freescale and ARM.

What is it?

The Freescale FRDM-K64F is built around the Kinetis K64F with 120 MHz, 256 KB RAM/1 MB Flash, running ARM mbed OS and with an Arduino form-factor and pin-out. A popular prototyping platform for both the mbed and Arduino communities, now joining forces with the Java ecosystem.

The Oracle Java ME Embedded 8.1 Developer Preview on FRDM-K64F offers:

  • A feature-rich and optimized Java ME 8 runtime in 190 KB RAM, enabling highly functional Java Embedded applications on single-chip micro-controller systems
  • Out-of-the-box support for Java 8 language, core APIs, networking, device I/O, storage, and more
  • Simple installation with a complete and ready-to-run binary, just copy it onto the device
  • Rich development and tooling via Java ME SDK 8.1 and NetBeans 8 IDE
  • Complements existing Java ME 8 platforms such as Raspberry Pi, scaling Java ME 8 from large to small
  • Ideal for evaluation and prototyping of small embedded & IoT solutions

What next?

Presentation: For more information and background have a look at the short slide deck “Introduction to Oracle Java ME Embedded 8.1 Developer Preview”.

Download: The Java ME Embedded 8.1 Developer Preview and the corresponding Java ME SDK 8.1 Early Access #3 are available NOW on the Oracle Technology Network (OTN).

Documentation: The release comes with Release Notes and Getting Started Guide for FRDM-K64F. There is also a full set of Java ME 8 documentation.

So grab a FRDM-K64F board from your favorite electronics shop or distributor, download the Developer Preview, and get started! Head over to the Java ME Embedded OTN forum to ask questions.

And finally, if you are watching the JavaOne 2014 Java Technical Keynote keep your eyes peeled for those little FRDM boards running Java ME 8 … 😉

Cheers,

— Terrence

Newsflash 757208

Over the years, Oracle has been making big investments in Java for ARM-based devices.

This week, Oracle and ARM announced further expanding their collaboration on a number of fronts, from additional hardware platforms, porting layers, and optimized communication protocols, to 64-bit ARMv8 support, and IoT architectures.

Henrik Stahl, VP of Product Management in the Java Platform Group at Oracle, just posted an excellent summary: “ARM TechCon 2013: Oracle, ARM expand collaboration on servers, Internet of Things”. Highly recommended reading.

Cheers,

— Terrence

Jai 3 3 video

Update 7/23/13: A good article/interview is on eWeek: “Oracle Aims Java ME Embedded at the Internet of Things”

On the heels of the recently refreshed Java ME Embedded 3.3 Early Access (EA) bits, Oracle is announcing today:

  • Oracle Java ME Embedded 3.3 GA (General Availability)
  • Oracle Java ME SDK 3.3 GA
  • The Oracle Java Platform Integrator Program

Here are the details:

Oracle Java ME Embedded 3.3

Oracle Java ME Embedded is an optimized, feature-rich Java runtime for resource-constrained devices, covering a wide range of platforms from small micro-controller devices up to mid-range embedded systems, including “Internet of Things” (IoT) and “Machine-to-Machine (M2M) devices. 

The 3.3 release comes with a range of new features and enhancements, such as additional peripheral support, developer productivity features (network monitor, memory status monitor), API enhancements, and other improvements. Ready-to-run binaries are available through Oracle Technology Network (OTN) for the following platforms:

Further, the Java ME SDK features an integrated Java ME Embedded emulation environment, which enabled developers to develop and test Java ME applications directly on PCs without the need for a physical hardware platform.

Oracle Java ME SDK 3.3

Along with the update of Oracle Java ME Embedded, the Oracle Java ME SDK toolchain has been updated to support the new Java ME Embedded features and platforms as well as improved device emulation, integrated memory and network monitor, usability enhancements, full Windows 7 support, and more. The NetBeans and Eclipse plugins have been updated as well.

Oracle Java Platform Integrator Program

The Oracle Java Platform Integrator Program enables companies developing embedded products on devices to leverage the technologies Oracle is providing across their choice of hardware and operating systems, allowing them to increase their differentiation and value-add,  improve application and service portability across a consistent platform, and reduce engineering efforts and time to market for their solutions through the pre-integrated and optimized Java Embedded stack.

Why is this important?

With this announcement, Oracle continues its push into the embedded space, with an enhanced and robust Java ME Embedded runtime, increased platform coverage, improved toolchain, and partner program that address a wide range of embedded use cases and opportunities in the IoT and M2M spaces.

Ok – Where can I find out more?

  • See the press release and watch the new video “Oracle Grows Java Capabilities in the Internet of Things”
  • Review the supporting resources (bottom of the press release page), including webcasts, “Getting Started” videos, and more
  • Check out the updated product home page, with Data Sheets, FAQs, and White Papers
  • Refer to a number of posts on my blog for more information (here, here, here, and here)

Exciting times. Stay tuned for more to come.

Cheers,

— Terrence

* Note: While the MCBSTM32F200 is the officially supported board, the release also works on the MCBSTM32F400 (which is the Cortex-M4 version)

Angela keil

Following up on yesterday’s release, Oracle evangelist Angela Caicedo has put together a great blog posting with all steps and code you need to develop and run your first Java application on an ARM Cortex-M3 developer board.

Alternatively, it you’d rather just sit back and watch, you can check out her webcast “Getting started with Java ME Embedded on KEIL” (part 1part 2).

Or, if you have a Raspberry Pi lying around, you could use that.

In any case, it has never been easier to get started with embedded Java applications!

Cheers,

— Terrence

10-billion.pngIt bears repeating: More than ever, the Java platform is the best technology for many embedded use cases. Java’s platform independence, high level of functionality, security, and developer productivity address the key pain points in building embedded solutions.

Transitioning from 16 to 32 bit or even 64 bit? Need to support multiple architectures and operating systems with a single code base? Want to scale on multi-core systems? Require a proven security model? Dynamically deploy and manage software on your devices? Cut time to market by leveraging code, expertise, and tools from a large developer ecosystem? Looking for back-end services, integration, and management?

The Java platform has got you covered. Java already powers around 10 billion devices worldwide, with traditional desktops and servers being only a small portion of that. And the ‘Internet of Things‘ is just really starting to explode … it is estimated that within five years, intelligent and connected embedded devices will outnumber desktops and mobile phones combined, and will generate the majority of the traffic on the Internet. Is your platform and services strategy ready for the coming disruptions and opportunities?

It should come as no surprise that Oracle is keenly focused on Java for Embedded. At JavaOne 2012 San Francisco the dedicated track for Java ME, Java Card, and Embedded keeps growing, with 52 sessions, tutorials, Hands-on-Labs, and BOFs scheduled for this track alone, plus keynotes, demos, booths, and a variety of other embedded content.

To further prove Oracle’s commitment, in 2012 for the first time there will be a dedicated sub-conference focused on the business aspects of embedded Java: Java Embedded @ JavaOne. This conference will run for two days in parallel to JavaOne in San Francisco, will have its own business-oriented track and content, and targets C-level executives, architects, business leaders, and decision makers.

Registration and Call For Papers for Java Embedded @ JavaOne are now live. We expect a lot of interest in this new event and space is limited, so be sure to submit your paper and register soon.

Hope to see you there!

Cheers,

— Terrence

Update: For more information, see the Java Embedded @ JavaOne Q & A

newsflash-757208.jpg

Just back from Brazil and no time to catch my breath … so much happening:

  • JavaOne Latin America was a blast – so much enthusiasm in the developer community! Check out some of the videos and podcasts, including the JavaOne Community Keynote, OTN interviews with a variety of Java luminaries, as well as the Java Spotlight Podcast #60: JavaOne Latin America: Videos and Podcasts
  • Java 7u2 has been released, featuring an updated VM, support for Oracle Solaris 11, support for Firefox 5 and later, and security fixes. Also, JavaFX 2.0.2 is now included with Java SE to make developing and running JavaFX applications even easier: Java SE 7u2 Release Notes, JavaFX 2.0.2 Release Notes
  • Aligning with mainline JDK development, Java SE Embedded 7u2 has been released as well. This release includes new ports to Linux on PPC and performance improvements on ARM systems by 20-40%. Also, Oracle intends to port JavaFX to Linux on ARM in order to support a broad range of platforms from mid-range embedded all the way to desktops: Henrik’s blog on the Java SE Embedded 7u2 release.
  • Lots of activity around JavaFX as well – interest is really taking off. Point in case: A new project, eFX, has been started on java.net aiming to create a generic application framework for JavaFX 2.0 based on the NetBeans platform: Geertjan’s blog on eFX
  • Finally, OTN put together a list of their “Most Popular Tech Articles of 2011”. Java topics, from Java SE 7 and 8 features, Java EE 6, JSF, and JavaFX dominate the list. Have a look: Our Most Popular Tech Articles of 2011

Cheers,

— Terrence

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