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Updates:

  • 5/15/2011: Added link to previous blog on Twitter API ME and a How-To (see below)

Smartphones get a lot of attention these days, but feature phones running Java ME outsell smartphones by a 5x-10x margin and have an installed based measured in the billions, not millions.

So, as an application developer or ISV, if you are going for the big markets, Java ME really needs to be part of your platform story. Not only does Java ME provide the big numbers, but Java ME also has all the tools and features to make creating great applications easy – applications that look and feel like smartphone-class applications.

Ok, so, let’s say you want to create one of those cool, new-fangled social networking-/location-based/interactive mash-up applications … Where do you start?

A while ago, I created a presentation and a sample application on just that topic. I presented it first at JavaOne 2010 in San Francisco as session S314178: “Beyond Smartphones: Rich Applications and Services for the Mobile Masses” and you can find the presentation by searching at the JavaOne content catalog.

video-shot.pngI’ve been continuously updating it since, and have now released the source code under the BSD license on java.net. The “Meet Me For Dinner” sample application and project shows the core building blocks and development aspects of creating rich and compelling applications and content for Java ME platforms.

The sample app is not perfect (still has a few minor bugs and is lacking some nice-to-have features) but the goal is to show interested developers how to get started and enables them, due to the liberal BSD license, to copy-and-paste code as a starting point for their own projects.

Check out this short video for an introduction. Then go the “Beyond Smartphones” project on java.net for the full sources, instructions on how to build and run the code, and a forum for questions. Also, see my previous post on the Twitter API ME for more information and a “How-To”.

Finally, if you’re planning to attend JavaOne in Hyderabad, India next week (May 10-11), be sure to attend the “Beyond Smartphones” session scheduled for Wednesday, May 11, at 3:45 pm.

Cheers,

— Terrence

20110302_003-low.jpg The amount of traffic and interest at the Oracle booth here at embeddedworld2011 has been nothing short of amazing. At times, the booth was overflowing with visitors, the demos were in high demand, and we’ve been busy pretty much non-stop since the start of the conference talking about Java SE Embedded, Java ME, Java Card, and Berkeley DB.

The value of embedded systems is increasingly driven by software, and Java’s platform independence, high level of functionality and security, mature tool chain, connectivity and scalability, and massive ecosystem put it on the top of the list. And our booth visitors see it that way, too.

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We’ve been talking to car manufacturers about upgrading vehicle control and entertainment systems with Java, utility companies wanting to add intelligence to their networks using Java, consumer electronic manufacturers who want to build smart and connected devices, medical device companies wanting to develop smarter Java-based patient monitoring systems, processor and board vendors wanting to add the Java runtime driven by demand from software developers, and much, much more.

Check out the “guerilla style” video we shot at the booth.

Cheers,

— Terrence

DukeRockStar02.pngWeek 3 of The Java Spotlight Podcast: An interview with Greg Bollella, Chief Architect of Embedded Java at Oracle, plus news and “What’s Cool”.

Cheers,

— Terrence

CTIAwireless.gif Oracle-Sun.png

With Mobile World Congress just finished the next big wireless show is only 2 weeks away: CTIA Wireless.

I won’t be there myself, but Oracle is putting together the

Oracle Developer Day 2010, March 23

Running from 11:00 am to 5 pm there is an array of talks for mobile developers on how to leverage Oracle technologies, including Java, to build compelling and scalable mobile applications:

  • Rapid and Declarative Mobile Application Development with Oracle Technologies, by Denis Tyrell, Senior Director, Server Technologies
  • Mobile Application Development with the Java ME SDK, by Hinkmond Wong, Principal Member of Technical Staff
  • Oracle Data Synchronization & Device Management for Mobile Platforms, by Boris Berdichevskiy, Development Manager
  • Creating Expressive Multi-Screen Content with JavaFX, by John Burkey, Chief Architect, Java and JavaFX Client Technologies
  • Java Card(TM) 3 Connected Platform: Opening development opportunities for billions of connected devices, by Peter Allenbach, Java Card Engineering

Additionally, on March 24:

  • Oracle Berkeley DB: Embedded data storage for devices, appliances, and applications, by Jon Milelli, Solution Architecture Director, Oracle Embedded Global Business Unit

For more information and the complete schedule please see here. Be sure to register.

Cheers,

— Terrence

mwc-2010.gifUPDATE:

It’s that time again … Mobile World Congress is upon us next week.

Sun and Oracle will be present in several locations exhibiting technologies, products, and services focused on communication.

At the Oracle Pavilion (AV #44) there will be demonstrations of the Sun Netra 6000 blades, the Oracle Communications Order and Service Management 7.0 solution, and a number of other products. More information and links can be found in the press release.

The Oracle-Sun booth in hall 8 (#8C55) will be all about mobile and wireless technologies, tools, and programs:

There are also a number of events planned by both Oracle and Sun. Come see us at the booth for more information.

I’ll be at the Oracle-Sun booth every day, so please stop by for a chat or to ask questions.

And finally, MWC is known for it’s parties and networking. I’ll definitely be at Swedish Beers – hope to see you there.

Cheers,

— Terrence

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UPDATES:

I was tied up in meetings most of the day yesterday so part 3 of the news round-up comes a day late … apologies.

Today, I’d like to summarize the highlights around developer communities and developer engagement under the Oracle+Sun announcements. I am mainly referring to “Overview and Frequently Asked Questions for the Developer Community” published on the Oracle Technology Network (OTN), but I will be including additional information I have collected in the past few days.

Summary points:

  • Oracle has a long history of engaging with developers on many levels and this history will continue with respect to Sun’s developer communities
  • The Oracle Technology Network (OTN) is one of the industry’s largest developer communities for both Oracle technologies as well as other industry-standard technologies such as Java and Linux. It is similar to the Sun Developer Network (SDN) in that it binds together the technical end-user community as well as Oracle developers and managers.
  • OTN features events, news, blogs, articles, wikis, discussions/forums, webcasts, downloads, FAQs, and more across a wide range of technology aspects, including databases, middleware, developer tools, enterprise management, and applications. Specifically for Java, check out the Java Developer Center.
  • Many of Sun’s developer sites and communities will remain unchanged in the near future: The Sun Developer Network (SDN), java.sun.com, java.net, BigAdmin, NetBeans.org, and others continue to operate normally. Some may be redesigned and integrated into OTN in the future in communication with the developer community.
  • Oracle enthusiastically supports Sun’s user groups such as the Java User Groups (JUGs), OpenSolaris User Groups, Java Champions, and other Sun-related user groups and has already started to reach out to these groups.
  • Oracle will also continue the tradition of Java evangelists committed to developer outreach, events, and programs.
  • Oracle will continue to invest in the Sun Academic Initiative (SAI) and Java Education and Development Initiative (JEDI) as well as in student communities generally, although the programs may be modified somewhat or migrated over to the Oracle Academy. More details to be provided as they become available.
  • Certification programs for Sun technologies: Oracle is committed to provide comprehensive training and certification programs in Sun technologies and will honor exam vouchers purchased through Sun.

JavaOne 2010:

As reported before JavaOne 2010 will be co-located with Oracle OpenWorld in San Francisco in the week of September 19. The call for papers (CFP) will go out shortly.

Sign up for the Oracle Developer Network (OTN):

Your SDN account will not be automatically migrated over to OTN. Sign up for a free account. Also, OTN features a number of regular publications such as the Java-related Dev2Dev Newsletter. Find more information here.

Cheers,

— Terrence

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This weekend SiliconIndia brings the Mobile Application Conference India to Bangalore. Sun is a conference sponsor and we are preparing a bunch of content and information around Sun’s technologies and programs such as the JavaFX Partner Program, the Java ME SDK 3.0, latest JavaFX applications and tools, and the Java Store.

The Sun India team would love to see you there!

Cheers,

— Terrence

Java ME SDK Mac OS.jpg

Update:

  • Nov 12: The issue regarding Java 1.5 has been fixed. The Java ME SDK 3.0 for Mac OS should now work with both Java 1.5 and Java 1.6.

It’s been a long time in the making … but it’s finally here. Native Java ME development is coming to Mac OS X!

The Java ME SDK 3.0 for Mac OS (Early Access) was released this morning. It supports CLDC and includes the following features:

  • Brings the functionality of the Java ME SDK 3.0 to Mac developers – first official Mac release.
  • Unique architecture enables the developer to work with the real device directly from within the ME SDK 3.0.
  • Communication with the devices, application deployment and even On-Device debugging are supported over Wi-Fi.
  • Supports the latest CLDC Hot Spot VM and Java Micro Edition APIs
  • High-end Tools for optimizations: Profiler, Network Monitor, Support for Debugging, Wireless Messaging Console and more
  • Introducing JavaFX 1.2.1 Mobile emulator running on Mac OS
  • Integrated Device Search Database for easy reference
  • Powerful Autoupdate for additional plug-ins and product updates
  • Development Environment based on NetBeans Platform

Complete list of APIs supported:

  • Mobile Information Device Profile (MIDP) 2.1 (JSR 118)
  • Connected Limited Device Configuration (CLDC) 1.1 (JSR 139)
  • Java Technology for the Wireless Industry 1.0 (JSR 185)
  • Mobile Service Architecture 1.0 (JSR 248)
  • PDA Optional Packages for the J2ME Platform (JSR 75)
  • Java APIs for Bluetooth (JSR 82)
  • Mobile Media API (MMAPI) 1.2 (JSR 135)
  • J2ME Web Services Specification (JSR 172)
  • Security and Trust Services API for J2ME (JSR 177)
  • Location API for J2ME (JSR 179)
  • SIP API for J2ME (JSR 180)
  • Wireless Messaging API (WMA) 2.0 (JSR 205)
  • Content Handler API (JSR 211)
  • Scalable 2D Vector Graphics API for J2ME (JSR 226)
  • Payment API (JSR 229)Mobile Internationalization API (JSR 238)
  • Mobile Sensor API (JSR 256)
  • XML API for Java ME (JSR 280)

It is ready for download now. Check it out and let us know what you think!

Important Installation Note:

The Java ME SDK 3.0 for Mac OS requires Java 1.6. You can download Java 1.6 from Apple’s update website or install it via the Mac OS “Software Update”. Next, be sure to verify Java 1.6 is set as the default runtime for Java applications in the Java Preferences (Applications->Utilities->Java Preferences).

For more info and a screen shot check out the Java ME SDK blog.

Cheers,

— Terrence

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